American Farming: Age-Old Profession Gets Young, Idealistic Upgrade

It’s the big 0-6! The sixth story in my series on farming and food systems has been published in The Guardian. An excerpt from “America’s new farmers: the age-old profession gets a young, idealistic upgrade,” is below:

Farmer Cultivation Center intern Melissa Piazza, 25, wants to have her own farm by the time she's 30. (Photo by Cole Allen).

Melissa Piazza, 25, wants to have her own farm by the time she’s 30. Piazza is a second-year intern at the Farmer Cultivation Center in Niwot, Colorado. (Photo by Cole Allen).

America’s farmers: the age-old profession gets a young, idealistic upgrade

Novice farmers don’t have it easy: in addition to lack of know-how, finding and paying for land can be a problem. But backing from the federal government has enabled many to make the leap – and, in doing so, change what farming can be

By Sena Christian

Within a 15-minute period on a chilly morning in January, the day went from good to bad for the two men who run Happy Acres farm in the town of Sherman, Connecticut.

Usually, a cold winter day in the north-east makes the only functioning tractor difficult to start up and the cows slip around on ice. They were prepared for that. But on this day, the tractor broke down completely and the silage unloader, which is needed to feed corn to the cattle, failed.

The two men tried to go about their morning chores on the 90-acre farm, letting their 55 cattle out of the barn, scraping out the stalls and putting down new bedding. But a broken tractor meant the manure inside wouldn’t be collected and spread over the fields, to return fertility back to the soil, and the cows wouldn’t have much to eat much besides the hay outside.

Then the problems, as they tend to, compounded. With the tractor out of commission, the barn cleaner – basically a big chain that pulls cow poop through a channel along the barn – couldn’t be used until the following day, once the equipment had been fixed. Backed-up manure had caused chain links to break and pop off the gears.

cow

The new generation of American farmers? (Photo by Jessica McConnell).

“After more chain clearing, pulling and hammering we got it all cleaned up and out,” says Happy Acres’ business manager, Adam Mantzaris, 35. “I guess the moral of all these stories is, make sure you fix things early or you end up having a shitty day. Pun intended.”
Lesson learned. And there will no doubt be many more to come.

Is Cellulosic Ethanol the Next Big Thing in Renewable Fuels?

Don’t get too excited, but here we have the third article in my series on alternative farming and food systems, which I’m working on as a Ted Scripps Fellow in Environmental Journalism in Colorado. And you can expect my fourth article to publish within the coming weeks. I’ve been one busy bee! My first piece was on the challenges of urban farming for Earth Island Journal. Next up: efforts to encourage military veterans to become farmers, written for Newsweek. My latest article is on the commercialization of cellulosic ethanol and its role in the food-versus-fuel debate for EIJ. Wham bam, thank you ma’am! Here’s an excerpt:

Michael Crowley, a senior scientist with the Chemical and Biosciences Center at NREL, created an animated model of Cel7A, which is nature’s primary enzyme for decaying plants. Visualizing the enzyme’s process could help scientists bioengineer a version that accelerates the cellulosic ethanol process. (Photo by Pat Corkery/courtesy of NREL).

Michael Crowley, a scientist with the NREL, created an animated model of Cel7A, which is nature’s primary enzyme for decaying plants. Visualizing the enzyme’s process could help scientists bioengineer a version that accelerates the cellulosic ethanol process. (Photo by Pat Corkery/courtesy of NREL).

Is Cellulosic Ethanol the Next Big Thing in Renewable Fuels?

Ongoing efforts to commercialize this clean energy source may lead the US to a more independent energy future

By Sena Christian

For a long time it seemed like turning the inedible parts of plants into a commercially viable biofuel, known as cellulosic ethanol, was nothing more than a pipedream. The enzymes needed to release sugars from cellulose — the fiber that forms plant structure — to be fermented into ethanol were inefficient and expensive. And the cellulose found in virtually every plant, flower, tree, grass, and bush is by its very nature evolved to withstand decay.

Ethanol can be derived from sugar-based, corn-based, and cellulose-based materials. In Brazil, sugarcane is the feedstock of choice, while in the United States that designation goes to corn. The starch in corn kernels easily converts into simple sugars, with the enzyme catalyzing this process costing a mere .03-cents per gallon; the sugars are then fermented into alcohol (additives make it undrinkable). Because of the relatively low cost, corn-based ethanol has been meeting America’s demand for an alternative fuel source, especially as people drive less and fuel economy improves.

Why even bother with cellulosic ethanol? For one, there’s the questionable carbon footprint of corn ethanol, which, depending on how it is produced, can be significantly better or significantly worse than that of petroleum. Greenhouse-gas emissions from cellulosic ethanol, on the other hand, are estimated to be roughly 86 percent lessthan petroleum sources. And using cellulosic materials doesn’t create a food-versus-fuel scenario. Ramping up production of the biofuel could reduce the nation’s reliance on imported oil. In 2012, the US imported about 40 percent of the petroleum it consumed, nearly three-quarters of which fueled transportation around the country. The US government also spends millions of dollars on military support to keep oil shipping lanes open; money that could go toward domestic needs instead.

… Read the rest of the article here …